Dean Koontz on His Strange New Supernatural Thriller Innocence

InnocenceDean Koontz on poisonous honey:

“If bees were to feed only on oleander and produce honey, the honey would kill you … When I was researching poisons I was fascinated that here was this shrub that in California is grown along the side of the highway in great big hedges, and one flower of it can kill you … Occasionally because people are not aware of its toxicity they chop it up and throw it in a salad to see what it’ll taste like, and it kills them. Or sometimes beekeepers who are amateurs don’t make sure what their bees are feeding on, and will produce poisonous honey. Everything in life is dangerous.”

Read the full interview @ Wired.com.

Q&A with Dean Koontz: On His Innocence – and His Future

InnocenceEditor’s Note: Everyday eBook had the pleasure recently of catching up with Dean Koontz. We talked about genre and inspiration and style and more, all below. Koontz’s latest novel, Innocence, is now available. And when you’re done whipping through that, check out his recent short story, Wilderness.

EVERYDAY EBOOK: You are an author who writes so brilliantly and prolifically across genres. Are there common threads among your books? Among your characters?

DEAN KOONTZ: You make me blush. But give me just a moment, and I’ll get over it. Well, I seem to be endlessly combining genres in different ways because as a reader I like all kinds of fiction and want to write in virtually every genre. When I first started doing this more than thirty years ago, publishers weren’t enthusiastic, but now it’s become acceptable, so I’ve never had to learn a trade like plumbing or carpentry. The common thread among the books is my view of the world: that it is a place of layered mysteries, of profound wonders and great beauty, where there is darkness and Evil but also hope that can’t be extinguished. If one thread runs through most of my lead characters, it is that they are not special agents with nearly superhuman skills, not indestructible mesomorphs, but ordinary people – masons, bartenders, gardeners, fry cooks – who suddenly find themselves in extraordinary situations. Sometimes they’re even people with disabilities, such as Chris Snow in Fear Nothing and Leilani Klonk in One Door Away from Heaven. Also, I find myself more interested in characters who are, in one way or another, outsiders or on the edges of society.

Read the full interview @ EverydayEbook.com.